Displaying items by tag: Netflix

Can Netflix Solve Its Marketing Problems?

21 April, 2022

On Tuesday, The Wrap published a piece about changes at Netflix's Kids and Family section of its animation division. Those changes included the exit of Phil Rynda, whose official title is Netflix’s Director of Creative Leadership and Development for Original Animation, along with several of his staff.

The article recounts some really brutal issues in the division, but this section jumped out at me:

Making matters more frustrating for creators are a set of imposed corporate guidelines that dictate, with Draconian exactness, the marketing and distribution of the series. Promotion doesn’t typically begin until a month before the shows premiere. (Sometimes they haven’t even been announced before then.) This leaves a very small window to build awareness and anticipation, much less cultivate genuine excitement. And once the show debuts on the platform, it can often get lost in the shuffle (how many times have you ever seen an animated series “above the fold” on the homepage?), leading many creators to become their own hype machines via various social media platforms.

Levers that other animation studios at bigger corporations can pull, like consumer products releases or promotional tie-ins, aren’t pulled at Netflix. There weren’t “Kid Cosmic” action figures lining the shelves of Target. You couldn’t get a “City of Ghosts” Happy Meal toy at McDonald’s. There’s no theme park or dedicated retail space to exploit either. On the official Netflix Shop, there isn’t a single Kids & Family animated series represented.

These complaints about Netflix's marketing decisions won't be a surprise to long-time readers of AllYourScreens, because I have been covering this issue for several years:

This might all sound like inside baseball whining. But I WANT to promote these shows. I want to highlight the best of them and surface some great smaller projects. And oftentimes it's a near-impossible task. My inconvenience is real, but that's not the real issue. Netflix often seems to have more faith in its internal ability to push programs over most external promotion. And we have no metrics from the outside that would support or disprove that theory.

What is true is that an increasing number of producers and outside studios feel as if they have to hire outside promotional help when their show launches. Probably 75% of the Netflix shows I've covered in the past few months have hired outside PR help. And I frequently hear from those publicists that their efforts to work with Netflix publicists on their show is beyond frustrating. (Note: I've seen some other journalists tweeting this 75% figure around as if it was the results of some in-depth study. This is just my experience & YMMV)

I think there are a couple of factors at play here, but the core issue is the role of the press and the related marketing of an upcoming show.

There is a very real belief inside Netflix that most press coverage is of marginal value, aside from being an effective way of letting subscribers know a series or movie is set to premiere. I've been told by more than one executive in recent years that their internal data shows the best method of content discovery is through Netflix - whether that is through outreach such as emails or content pushes inside the Netflix app itself.

And that may very well be the case. But that approach also has some notable flaws. First, given the amount of new content Netflix is releasing, there is just not enough bandwidth to properly promote every new project. And if your project isn't prioritized, you can feel as if no one knows you even exist. Especially if you have a project that is too complicated or nuanced to sell through a catchy thumbnail image.

That belief in internal promotion efforts is also part of the reason why Netflix insists on not beginning any promotion or marketing of a show or movie until very close to the premiere date. There are exceptions to this when the project is high-profile and/or the talent has insisted on a certain level of promotional efforts as part of the their deal. But generally speaking, most TV shows and movies are lucky to get any marketing a week or two in advance of the premiere. Which often leads to subscribers seeing something new and saying "Hey, where did that come from? I had no idea it was even coming out?"

Now, Netflix executives will argue that surprised eureka moment is the most effective type of marketing. And once again, while that may indeed be the case, the problem is that eureka moment is the result of luck as much as marketing. And entirely too many shows don't get the "accidental" attention needed to bring in the expected level of viewers.

This belief is extremely frustrating to producers, showrunners and other crew, who often find themselves unable to publicly reach out to the audience most likely to watch the show. "I worked on a show based on a game and I begged Netflix executives to let me drum up interest on the show," one producer on a recent Netflix series told me. "I was told in no uncertain terms that I was not allowed to get out in front of the Netflix PR people. And they didn't do anything until a bit more than a week before the premiere. The company prevented me from promoting my own show, then complained after it premiered that it didn't get the number of viewers they expected,: he continued. "I wonder why not?"

And all of these challenges are simple compared to the complications that come from trying to cover Netflix's international releases. While there are a few higher profile international releases that receive marketing and promotional efforts in the U.S., most of the programs made outside of the U.S. are just set free here in hopes that someone will discover them. To be fair, this isn't a problem limited to Netflix. The promotion of internationally-produced programming is a serious problem for HBO Max and Disney. And at least in the case of Netflix, they spend the money to dub the shows into a wide range of languages. 

Marketing is hard and proper PR can be labor-intensive. But if Netflix executives really do want to be more cost-conscious and hope to be more efficient, then giving every new title as much of an edge as possible seems like a pretty cost-effective approach to the problem. It would also help the streamer's reputation inside Hollywood, which could use a boost after the events of the past week.

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Promoting Your TV Show In The Age Of Netflix

01 February, 2020

I have been bullish on Netflix for a long, long time. I interviewed Reed Hastings in 1999 for a now-defunct financial news web site and at the time I was struck by his vision of the future. Even in the company's earliest years, he was already thinking about what Netflix would look like in the digital era. At a time when his company's business was entirely based on DVDs & most people still had dial-up internet accounts, Hastings talked about a future in which Netflix would deliver titles online. Which in 1999 seemed to be about as likely a scenario as the existence of a refrigerator that emails you when you need to buy eggs.

But for all of the things I think they do right, I've always been frustrated with how they promote their original programs. Netflix has some passionate, knowledgeable and helpful publicists. But the overall promotional strategy for the company seems to be that except for a few, high-profile projects, it's more important to promote the service than any individual program.

That's why I was not at all surprised when Netflix recently announced it was letting about 15 marketing people go in the company's L.A. offices. In the Variety story, a Netflix source admitted that the move was part of an effort to shift promotional focus to the overall Netflix brand:

The company will continue to promote individual shows as part of its greater marketing initiatives to promote the whole service.

In theory, I understand the reasoning behind the shift. With entire seasons of shows being released in one drop, spending time on any one show might seem like a waste of resources. Especially at a time when Netflix releases multiple new shows in one week (and often, one day). And to be fair, even broadcast networks end up doing triage when it comes to promoting its new shows. More than once, I've tried to get help from a show publicist & quickly realized that the network was already cutting its losses.

But Netflix's reluctance to promote all of its original programming has a couple of unrelated but important impacts on the way critics cover its shows as well as any individual show's ability to grab enough viewers to get the order for another season.

From a TV critic's point of view, trying to get even basic information about many shows is damn near impossible. Netflix sends out emails highlighting higher-profile shows and oftentimes review screeners are available. But it's common to only get 3-4 episodes of the 8-10 episode season. It's also common for reviews to have an embargo that doesn't lift until the show actually hits Netflix. Which leaves critics with the option of posting a review of a partial season when the viewers have access to the entire thing. Or screen the episodes we get ahead of time & then quickly watch the remaining episodes and post a review.

To be honest, while those restrictions are unwieldy at times, the biggest issue for me is the number of shows that hit Netflix with little or no promotional efforts whatsoever. Take, for example, the recent documentary series "Pandemic: How To Prevent An Outbreak." The series is a great look at viral pandemics & given that it came out the week the Chinese coronavirus outbreak hit the news, the show should have gotten tons of attention. But apparently no one received an early look at the show, since every review I could find was written after it premiered. Providing at least some promotion for the series seems like a dunk shot, but it's just another show that came and went before most Netflix users discovered it. 

And that is often the case for mid-tier original shows premiering on Netflix. You have to scramble to track down screeners, and even if you get one there is often little or no cast and crew information. Photos have no credits on them and even when the show has a page on the Netflix media site, there is increasingly only a generic email contact.

This might all sound like inside baseball whining. But I WANT to promote these shows. I want to highlight the best of them and surface some great smaller projects. And oftentimes it's a near-impossible task. My inconvenience is real, but that's not the real issue. Netflix often seems to have more faith in its internal ability to push programs over most external promotion. And we have no metrics from the outside that would support or disprove that theory.

What is true is that an increasing number of producers and outside studios feel as if they have to hire outside promotional help when their show launches. Probably 75% of the Netflix shows I've covered in the past few months have hired outside PR help. And I frequently hear from those publicists that their efforts to work with Netflix publicists on their show is beyond frustrating. (Note: I've seen some other journalists tweeting this 75% figure around as if it was the results of some in-depth study. This is just my experience & YMMV)

Netflix PR people will likely consider this all a bunch of whining from a smaller individual web site. Fair enough, believe what you want. But Netflix is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on production deals in order to grab the hottest creative talent. And a fair amount of that effort is going to be wasted if the Hollywood community begins to believe that the creative freedom offered by Netflix is more than offset by the service's haphazard promotional efforts. Hiring an outside PR firm to promote your show shouldn't be the default approach on any network or streaming service. The fact that so many producers believe it's an essential expense is a failing of Netflix and it's not one they seem to be interested in addressing right now.

I am not one of the television critics or industry experts who believe releasing an entire season for binging at one time is a bad idea. But I do believe that covering and promoting bingeable television requires some new skill sets and approaches. And for all of its expertise, Netflix still hasn't figured out the most effective method to adequately promote all of its billions of dollars a year of new programs.


No, Netflix Doesn't Need To Discard Its Binge Release Method

20 April, 2022

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One consequence of Netflix releasing its bad Q1 numbers yesterday is that every person with a Netflix account is suddenly an expert on what the company needs to do to turn things around. And in many cases, these criticisms conflate "this is the way I use Netflix" with "this is what I think Netflix is doing wrong."

One of the more commonly heard refrains - particularly on social media - is that Netflix needs to move away from its binge-release method of premiering shows. But does that make sense and would that move make Netflix's future any easier? Let's take a look at some of the arguments against the binge release method and you can decide for yourself.

Since Netflix drops an entire season at one time, people can just subscribe for a month and then drop Netflix until the next time something comes along they want to see.

Yes, they COULD do that. But given that Netflix consistently has the lowest churn rate in the industry, it seems obvious that not many subscribers feel the need to do that. One of the rationales for Netflix creating so much content is the theory that even after you've watched your favorite show, there is something else new there you might find interesting. 

By the way, "interesting" doesn't always mean a high-profile scripted show. Most people watch a range of content and that means everything from true crime and dating shows to older, lesser-known movies featuring familiar stars.

And when you look at today's Top Ten list of Netflix programs in the U.S., there is a bit of everything reflected in the lineup. Anatomy Of A Scandal and Bridgerton are #1 and #3, but the second most-watched title is The Ultimatum: Marry Or Move On. The top ten also include a 2007 Samuel Jackson film (Cleaner), a suspenseful thriller (Choose or Die) and older licensed episodes of some well-known shows (Better Call Saul, Queen Of The South, Married At First Sight). 

This mix of content might not be what you want to see, but it's an attempt to please the largest number of people. It's what I've described in the past as the theory of perceived value:

The lesson from all of this is that the temptation is to look at some ideal monthly subscription fee charged by a streaming service & use that as a benchmark for a service's "value." But in reality, what a service is worth in the real world is a concept called "perceived value." This is how it's described in the business dictionary:

A customer's opinion of a product's value to him or her. It may have little or nothing to do with the product's market price and depends on the product's ability to satisfy his or her needs or requirements.

Media industry analysts and reporters often parrot the argument that "content is king." And while content is important, a bigger factor in the success of a media business is perceived value to the customer. How valuable is the content to the customers you're targeting? Is your user interface friendly enough that it doesn't lessen the value of your content in the eyes of frustrated users? There are a lot of factors that go into how customers perceive the value of a streaming service. And because it's all a bit squishy & difficult to quantify on a spreadsheet, it's often overlooked by industry analysts.

For instance, subscribers numbers are important. But to a certain extent, subscriber numbers are also a lagging indicator of perceived value. The customers subscribe in large BECAUSE the price matches or is lower than their perceived value of the service. It's why the cost of Amazon Prime Video is rolled into a package that includes everything from free music to free shipping. That's the customer's perceived value of the Amazon content. 

Netflix's subscriber numbers slumped in its more mature markets during Q1 not because it was binge releasing episodes of Is It Cake? It struggled because for some subscribers, the recent subscription rate hike and/or other economic factors meant that the cost of Netflix was more than its perceived value to the customer.

Dropping an entire season at one time means that shows get lost and are often forgotten a month after they are released.

There are really two different problems here, so let's unpack them separately.

While we're still relatively early in the streaming era, I think one thing we know for sure is that the biggest factor in whether or not a show surfaces in the pop culture zeitgeist is the quality of the show. Plenty of big-budget programs were released on a weekly basis and absolutely no one noticed (The Lost Symbol, The Mysterious Benedict Society). While I suspect it is true that some shows get overlooked when dropped in a binge format, these are also shows that probably would have struggled even if episodes had been released weekly. 

And most times, when someone is arguing that their favorite show failed because it was released in a binge format, most other viewers who have seen the show realize the problem was creative, not logistical.

But when Netflix releases so much stuff at the same time, great programs get lost in the flood of new content.

I do think the complaint that shows get lost is a valid one, but the primary reason is not because of the method the episodes are released.

I've long been critical of Netflix's marketing efforts and while the company has made some improvements, too many projects are just dropped onto the service with little advance promotion:

And that is often the case for mid-tier original shows premiering on Netflix. You have to scramble to track down screeners, and even if you get one there is often little or no cast and crew information. Photos have no credits on them and even when the show has a page on the Netflix media site, there is increasingly only a generic email contact.

This might all sound like inside baseball whining. But I WANT to promote these shows. I want to highlight the best of them and surface some great smaller projects. And oftentimes it's a near-impossible task. My inconvenience is real, but that's not the real issue. Netflix often seems to have more faith in its internal ability to push programs over most external promotion. And we have no metrics from the outside that would support or disprove that theory

It's especially an issue with programs produced in another region. Highlighting global content is a tough challenge and no streaming service really has it figured out. But if international content is the future, then Netflix and its rivals need to figure out the promotional challenges. 

Because I review more international programming than most U.S. sites, I receive a lot more outreach about global shows. But because of the way the promotional efforts are set up, that means I am getting information in a variety of languages. And while Google translate is helpful, it's a clunky way to learn about the newest show from Poland or Portugal.

It's also true that despite a lot of work on the part of Netflix's PR teams, many producers still feel the need to hire outside PR firms to properly promote their projects. To be fair, there is always going to be some unhappiness on that front. But there is more of it with Netflix than with most other streamers.

But I miss the experience of reading weekly recaps and sharing a common cultural experience with other viewers over the course of a season.

That experience was wonderful and you can still experience that to a lesser degree with some shows that are released on a weekly basis. But to a certain extent, that complaint is similar to the one that music fans make about the lessened importance of album releases. It was fun to experience an entire album beginning to end, without being able to cherry pick tracks and only buy the ones you wanted. But both of those shared cultural experiences reflect a bygone era and that won't change even if every show was released weekly and you could only buy complete albums and not individual songs.

Change is hard and it's not always for the best. But while blaming your unhappiness on binge releases might make you feel better, it won't change the reality of the world we live in.






LA County COVID-19 Outbreaks Reported At Netflix, CBS, NBC And More

11 January, 2021

Here is a list of entertainment industry COVID-19 outbreaks currently being tracked by the Los Angeles County Health Department. Their list includes any location where three or more cases have been reported within the past 14 days:

CBS Studio Center Bungalow 3, Lyons Gate Production
4024 Radford Ave, 3, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 26

CBS Studio Center Stage 04
4024 Radford Ave, 3, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 11

CBS Studio Center Stage 14
4024 Radford Ave, 3, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 8

NBC Universal - Mr. Mayer Production (I am assuming they mean "Mr. Mayor")
100 Universal City Plz, Bldg 5225, Universal City, CA, 91608
Total confirmed staff cases: 12

NBC Universal Stage 1
3900 Lankershim Boulevard, Stag
e 1, Building 2230, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 7

Netflix Productions
18421 S Main St, Gardena, CA, 90248
Total confirmed staff cases: 9

Pluto TV
8684 Melrose Ave, West Hollywood, CA, 90069
Total confirmed staff cases: 10

Warner Bros Television - Lucifer
4000 Warner Blvd, Bldg 28/ Suite 1300, Burbank, CA, 91522
Total confirmed staff cases: 17

Warner Bros Television - Young Sheldon
4000 Warner Blvd, Building 191, Burbank, CA, 91522
Total confirmed staff cases: 11




LA County COVID-19 Outbreaks Reported At Netflix, CBS, NBC, Sets Of 'Lucifer,' 'Young Sheldon' And Others

30 December, 2020

Here is a list of entertainment industry COVID-19 outbreaks currently being tracked by the Los Angeles County Health Department. Their list includes any location where three or more cases have been reported within the past 14 days:

CBS Studio Center Bungalow 3, Lyons Gate Production
4024 Radford Ave, 3, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 26

CBS Studio Center Stage 04
4024 Radford Ave, 3, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 11

CBS Studio Center Stage 14
4024 Radford Ave, 3, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 8

NBC Universal - Mr. Mayer Production (I am assuming they mean "Mr. Mayor")
100 Universal City Plz, Bldg 5225, Universal City, CA, 91608
Total confirmed staff cases: 12

NBC Universal Stage 1
3900 Lankershim Boulevard, Stag
e 1, Building 2230, Studio City, CA, 91604
Total confirmed staff cases: 11

Netflix Productions
18421 S Main St, Gardena, CA, 90248
Total confirmed staff cases: 9

Pluto TV
8684 Melrose Ave, West Hollywood, CA, 90069
Total confirmed staff cases: 10

Warner Bros Television - Lucifer
4000 Warner Blvd, Bldg 28/ Suite 1300, Burbank, CA, 91522
Total confirmed staff cases: 13

Warner Bros Television - The Kominsky Method
4000 Warner Blvd, Burbank, CA, 91522
Total confirmed staff cases: 10

Warner Bros Television - Young Sheldon
4000 Warner Blvd, Building 191, Burbank, CA, 91522
Total confirmed staff cases: 12




Why Netflix Is A Lot Like Fortnite

17 November, 2020

There are a lot of people in the television industry who hate bingeing. Some of it is just a generational unease: watching eight episodes back-to-back isn't the way I grew up watching television! Most TV critics hate it because viewers getting an entire season at once compresses the amount of time they have to cover the series. And because they tend to think they have more influence on viewing habits than they do, they conflate fewer opportunities to write weekly episodic recaps with less buzz about a show.

A lot of Hollywood creatives dislike the practice as well. They have some of the same qualms as the critics do when it comes to compressed promotional timelines. There is a sense that dumping an entire season at one time makes it feel as if the season has come and gone within several weeks. And that not releasing an episode a week means the show doesn't have an opportunity to build an audience and drill its way into the cultural zeitgeist.

And any time a show does very well being released an episode a week, there are lots of snarky hot takes along the lines of "See, The Mandalorian did just great and it was released one episode at a time!" Which is a version of the same creative impulsive that led every music label in 1967 to tell the rock bands they had signed that "See, The Beatles did well with a concept album. Everyone should do one!"

While the best answer to the question "Is bingeing a good idea" is the very practical but not all that exciting response "It depends." But the question also opens up another related conversation about how bingeing television is at its core a marketing tool.

My 15-year-old son plays the Battle Royale game Fortnite. At its core, Fortnite isn't all that different that a lot of other games with similar concepts. But Fortnite has become a gaming juggernaut because of the way it uses change to create an overall experience greater than the game. Fortnite creator Epic Games has crafted a series of built-in changes into the game, ensuring that there is always something new to experience. The game is broken down into discreet "seasons," which are massive changes to the gameplay that happen about every 10-12 weeks. But inside each season are a seemingly endless number of new tasks, challenges, mini-games, characters, skins and weapons. When you play Fortnite, it feels as if there is something new every time you log on. The game uses change as a way to increase engagement.

And I'd argue that Netflix uses bingeing in the same way. Sure, given the amount of new content Netflix adds each week, drawing out every season with a once-a-week episode release would be a marketing and promotional nightmare. But more importantly for Netflix, the rapid cycling through of content has become a core feature of the service. While there are going to be some times when you sign onto Netflix for a specific show, most times you just sign on and see what's new. The bingeing release schedule ensures that there are always new options and plenty of good things to watch that you missed when they originally premiered. For Netflix - like Fortnite - change is the best marketing tool it has.

I'm Not Saying That This New Yorker Piece About Netflix & Ambient TV Is The Dumbest Thing You'll Read This Week. But...

17 November, 2020

There is a strain of media criticism that falls into the category of "this is my experience & I'm making a wide-ranging conclusion about this subject based on me." Now if you've spent any time at all at AllYourScreens, you know that I am all too familiar with that style of journalism. I inject myself into stories with an ease that I'm sure is indicative of some sort of untreated psychological problem. Still, I do try and remember that while it's okay to share my opinion, I am by no means an average media consumer or for that matter, a baseline for any sort of media consumption.

The problem with writing a piece around your own personal take is that you can simultaneously be making a good point while at the same time replowing ground others have tackled for a long time. And that is certainly with the case with "Emily In Paris And The Rise Of Ambient TV," a piece by Kyle Chayka that appears in the latest edition of The New Yorker.

The premise of the piece is that Netflix is focusing on creating television that is meant to be casually viewed and Chayka offers up this observation as if it was an idea that is new and unexpected:

In this and other recent programming, Netflix is pioneering a genre that I’ve come to think of as ambient television. It’s “as ignorable as it is interesting,” as the musician Brian Eno wrote, when he coined the term “ambient music” in the liner notes to his 1978 album “Ambient 1: Music for Airports,” a wash of slow melodic synth compositions. Ambient denotes something that you don’t have to pay attention to in order to enjoy but which is still seductive enough to be compelling if you choose to do so momentarily. Like gentle New Age soundscapes, “Emily in Paris” is soothing, slow, and relatively monotonous, the dramatic moments too predetermined to really be dramatic. Nothing bad ever happens to our heroine for long. The earlier era of prestige TV was predicated on shows with meta-narratives to be puzzled out, and which merited deep analyses read the day after watching. Here, there is nothing to figure out; as prestige passes its peak, we’re moving into the ambient era, which succumbs to, rather than competes with, your phone.

Not to be snarky, but "I've come to think of" is one of those phrases you use when you are relying on a hunch rather than data to build a premise. And while it may be true that Netflix leans into content that doesn't require a lot of intense attention, there are a couple of huge problems with this premise.

The first is that the idea of "ambient television" isn't a new idea. Television scholar Anna McCarthy wrote a book called Ambient Television about 15 years ago. TV has always been ambient. Oh, sometimes industry people called it "lay back television" or some other phrase. But it's an idea as old as the television industry. And to be fair, Chayka does reluctantly admit that television history is full of examples of "ambient television." He also doesn't mention the real home of ambient television, AVOD's such as Pluto TV.

But like a lot of journalists who write about media while also have mild contempt for the medium, Chayka then attempts to use ambient television as the jumping off point for everything from a criticism of TikTok to the theory that Netflix's content algorithm's are a form of white nationalism:

The ambience of ambient TV is often predicated on homogeneity; any diversity or discordance would disrupt the smooth, lulling surface. (“Emily in Paris” almost entirely stars white actors, too.) The lurking subtext of “Dream Home Makeover,” a kind of soft-white capitalist nationalism cloaked in throw pillows, brought to mind for me the architect Rem Koolhaas’s essay “The Generic City,” from 1995. In it, Koolhaas argues that globalization has caused a mass homogenization that leaves modern cities feeling like an airport, “a trance of almost unnoticeable aesthetic experiences.” He added that the “pervasive lack of urgency and insistence acts like a potent drug,” inducing “a hallucination of the normal.” In other words, the hypnotic quality of ambient content creates a false sense that whatever it presents is a neutral condition, a common denominator, though it is decidedly not.

Honestly, as much as I admire the writing in The New Yorker, it can sometimes be tone deaf and dismissive of anything that feels mainstream or pop culture. There is a good point buried at the heart of "Emily In Paris And The Rise Of Ambient TV." But it's buried beneath a grab bag of random ideas about media that ultimately reads like a bad media studies term paper.


Sales Of British Homes Named 'Hill House' Drop Following Netflix Series

29 October, 2020

New research by the Yorkshire Building Society claims the success of the Netflix series The Haunting Of Hill House has led to a decline in the property price for homes that are named "Hill House."

In the Netflix series, five siblings who grew up in the most famous haunted house in America are reunited by the suicide of their youngest sister, which "forces them to finally confront the ghosts of their own pasts… some which lurk in their minds... and some which may really be lurking in the shadows of the iconic Hill House."

According to the study, sales of properties that are named Hill House have seen a 37% drop in the two years since The Haunting of Hill House was on Netflix. The study compared the 528 property transactions for houses named Hill House in the two years prior to the series airing, with the 334 transactions that took place in the two years following.

Not surprisingly, while a property bearing the name "Hill House" or "Amityville Death Villa" might scare off some potential buyers, some realtors say that reluctance offers the opportunity for other less superstitious buyers to get a deal.

"It seems that house sales are possibly being affected by scary films," said Benjamin Merritt, Senior Manager of Mortgages at the Yorkshire Building Society. "Whilst this can be a horror story in itself for sellers, for those people not bothered by spooky house names, it could be the perfect opportunity to buy a home in an area which may previously have been out of reach.”

 

 

 

 

Longtime Netflix Exec Joins Deluxe As Chief Strategy Officer

23 October, 2020

Longtime Netflix executive Anna Lee is joining Deluxe Entertainment Services in the newly created position of chief strategy officer. She will oversee business opportunities for Los Angeles-based Deluxe, which offers a range of services to film and TV studios, digital content providers, advertising agencies, fulfillment, and home entertainment. Lee spent 12-years at Netflix where she headed global content services,

Deluxe was recently acquired by private equity firm Platinum Equity, which reportedly brought back previous CEO Cyril Drabinsky, who Lee reports to.

"Anna is an exceptional leader and her experience in digital cinema, supply-chain workflows, and the global OTT space will ensure that Deluxe can maximize opportunities given the dramatic shifts in the marketplace," Drabinsky said in a statement.