Displaying items by tag: Today's Song You Should Know

Today's Song You Should Know: 'Ghosts' By Bruce Springsteen

24 September, 2020

"Ghosts" is the second track released off of Bruce Springsteen's upcoming album "Letter To You" and the song will be a treat for fans hoping to hear some of the classic E-Street Band sound. Springsteen's voice might be weathered around the edges, but the tune is vintage Springsteen at its best. Solid chugging guitars and piano, explosive drums and just a hint of saxophone at the end. The video cuts between classic performance footage of Springsteen & the E-Streeters (along with snippets of a couple of old pre-E-Street bands) and footage shot earlier this year as the band recorded the track live in the studio.

The lyrics reflect a lot of the themes Springsteen has been discussing in interviews done to promote the new album. How we get to a certain age and we're both happy to still be here and doing good work. While still being haunted by the ghosts of all the loved ones we left behind. While the song is technically named "Ghosts," most people will probably refer to it by it's massive hook, "I'm Alive."

If this is a representative sample of what we can expect to hear on the new album, it can't get here fast enough.


Today's Song You Should Know: 'Super Cool' By Kiki Dee

09 October, 2020

If most people know the name of Kiki Dee at all, it's because of her connection with Elton John. At the height of his 1970s fame, John signed Kiki Dee to his newly formed Rocket Records and he tried hard to break her big as a solo artist. Dee had released her first solo single in 1964 and had released a number of well-regarded singles and several albums. But while some of the tunes got airplay in the UK, she never quite had a hit. She bounced from label to label and by 1970 became the first white artist signed to Motown Records.

Her fortunes changed when John signed her to his label and her first Rocket Records single - "Amoureuse" - became a Top 15 hit in the U.K. The resulting album "Loving & Free" also included "Super Cool," written by Elton John & Bernie Taupin. The single didn't chart anywhere, but it's a fabulous song and it is instantly recognizable as a John/Taupin track from that era. In fact, I suspect that if John had released the song himself it would have been a huge hit.

Dee's next album spawned the 1974 Top 15 U.S. hit "I've Got The Music In Me," but none of her follow-up singles charted. In 1976 she had her biggest hit when Dusty Springfield was too sick to record the duet "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" with Elton John. That song went to #1 in more than 20 countries and was John's first #1 in the U.K.

Dee has continued to record in the years since and had several modest U.K. hits. But her biggest chart success in recent years was in 1993, when the track "True Love" (a duet with Elton John off of his "Duets" album) went to #2 in the U.K. Her most recent release was the 2013 single "Steppin' Out With A Soul Man."





Today's Song You Should Know: 'Bad Girl' By The Bad Examples

10 October, 2020

There are certain moments in American rock when a town or region just seems to capture whatever cultural zeitgeist is in the air. The L.A. hair band scene in the early 1980s, the New York City punk scene of the late 1970s and the Seattle grunge sound in the 1990s propelled a bunch of local bands into the national spotlight. But the scenes that have always fascinated me are the ones that never quite caught fire, despite having a depth of talent as deep as any of the ones that are now household names.

I lived in Chicago in the 1980s and early 1990s and the city had a rock scene that was as strong as any that I've ever seen. But for some reason, the talent was never able to capitalize on the magic. A couple of bands managed a bit of commercial success (like "Off Broadway"), but most of the bands ended up being talented footnotes in rock scene that never quite caught fire.

The Bad Examples was one band that I was certain would be superstars. They were a tight band live and had a pop/rock sound that sounded like a ballsier, less condescending Squeeze. Yet despite releasing several really strong albums, they never managed to get signed to a major label and never really grew past the "really hot in our home town" phase.

"Bad Girl" was one of my favorites to hear live back in the day and listening to the song in 2020, I'm struck by just how radio-friendly the tune sounds in retrospect. It's always hard to determine why an individual song wasn't a hit, but if a radio station was to play "Bad Girl" as part of their 80s/90s format, I think most listeners would just assume it had been a hit and that they had just forgotten about it.

I highly recommend tracking down the band's music, especially the 1991 album Bad Is Beautiful, which includes the radio-friendly "Ashes Of My Heart" as well as their best-known song, "Not Dead Yet." In the end, it's an ironic twist of fate that despite the talent in the band, lead singer Ralph Covert became a success not as a member of The Bad Examples, but for his string of "Ralph's World" children's albums, one of which was nominated for a Grammy.